Simple and multiple logistic regression analysis regarding activities impacting sleep high quality

But not, decades, sex, and you may staff tenure were not found to be high in the several logistic regression research (Table 4)

Good sleep quality was reported by 1152 (78.3%) participants, while 319 (21.7%) reported poor sleep quality. Poor sleep quality was experienced by 19.8% of participants with adequate serum vitamin D levels and by 26.2% of participants with serum vitamin D deficiency (P = .007). Poor sleep quality was more common in those younger than 30 years of age (26.3%) than in those 30 years of age or older (18.0%) (P < .001). Poor sleep quality was significantly more common (P = .006) in females (27.6%) than in males (20.2%). Unmarried participants were more likely to have poor sleep quality (26.2%) than married participants (17.6%) (P < .001). Participants with a high school education or less reported poor sleep quality more frequently (27.2%) than those with a bachelor's degree or higher (19.0%) (P < .001). Those who had worked for 5–9 years had the highest prevalence of poor sleep quality (24.5%), while those with a work tenure of 10 years or more had the lowest prevalence of poor sleep quality (18.5%) (P = .037). Those who reported high levels of occupational stress exhibited poor sleep quality more frequently (29.3%) than those with low levels of occupational stress (19.5%) (P < .001). Regular exercise, smoking habits, alcohol consumption habits, body mass index, and testing season were not associated with significant differences in sleep quality (Table 3).

Logistic regression analysis was used to identify variables with a effect on sleep quality. Simple logistic regression analysis showed an odds ratio (OR) of 1.43 (95% CI, 1.10–1.87) for having poor sleep quality in those with serum vitamin D deficiency. High risks of poor sleep quality were also found in other groups: those younger than 30 years of age (OR = 1.63; 95% CI, 1.27–2.09), females (OR = 1.50; 95% CI, 1.12–2.01), unmarried subjects (OR = 1.67; 95% CI, 1.30–2.14), those with a high school education or less (OR = 1.59; 95% CI, 1.23–2.06), and those with high occupational stress (OR = 1.55; 95% CI, 1.15–2.09). Employee tenure of 10 or more years was associated with a lower risk of poor sleep quality (OR = 0.74; 95% CI, 0.55–0.99) than those with <5 years of tenure. Variables in the simple logistic regression analysis were adjusted for in the multiple logistic regression analysis. The resulting OR was 1.36 (95% CI, 1.01–1.82) for poor sleep quality in the serum vitamin D deficiency group. Statistical significance was also found for being unmarried (OR = 1.47; 95% CI, 1.04–2.08), having a high school education or less (OR = 1.32; 95% CI, 1.03–1.77), and high occupational stress (OR = 1.85; 95% CI, 1.38–2.47).

Variations in the overall PSQI score along with for every product off the fresh new PSQI based on serum supplement D profile

The mean total PSQI score of all participants was 3.97 ± 2.26. Subjects in the serum vitamin D deficiency group showed a mean PSQI score of 4.25 ± 2.37, while those with serum vitamin D levels ?10 ng/mL averaged 3.85 ± 2.15 (P = .002). The mean scores for each PSQI component were as follows: subjective sleep quality was poorer in those with vitamin D deficiency (1.05 ± 0.63, vs. 0.96 ± 0.61 in the non-deficient group) (P = .020), sleep latency was poorer in those with vitamin D deficiency (0.84 ± 0.85, vs. 0.64 ± 0.75 in the non-deficient group) (P < .001), and the sleep duration score was poorer in those with vitamin D deficiency (1.10 ± 0.65, vs. 1.03 ± 0.62 in the non-deficient group) (P = .041). Significant differences in the mean score were not found for the remaining categories of habitual sleep efficiency, sleep disturbances, use of men seeking women ad sleep medication, and daytime dysfunction (Table 5).

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